Choosing a Second Language

Choosing a Second Language

There are a seemingly infinite number of studies and reports out there on the value of a second language—everything from increased business opportunities to an enhanced ability to empathize or to think creatively. Mastery of a second language is supposed to increase potential lifetime earnings, and possibly stave off dementia and Alzheimer’s. It's also part of every Bachelor of Arts degree, and therefore a graduation requirement for many college undergraduates. So if learning a second language is part of your college future, how do you choose which one to study? 

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Sunday Dinners: Croque-Monsier (AKA the Grown-Up Ham and Cheese Sandwich)

Sunday Dinners: Croque-Monsier (AKA the Grown-Up Ham and Cheese Sandwich)

My good friend Stephanie has brought us some of the most popular Sunday Dinner recipes over the past months--Pepper Jack Butternut Squash RisottoMac and Cheese Quinoa, and a Hearty Pumpkin Polenta. She has a flare for making simple, filling food just a touch fancier than the average recipe, with extra-delicious results. 

Call it by its "grown up" name and this ham and cheese sandwich becomes something to brag about. Enjoy! 

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Success: Planning the Next Year for Short-Term and Long-Term Goals

Success: Planning the Next Year for Short-Term and Long-Term Goals

The first week back at school is a really good time to think through what you hope for and need for the coming year, and to examine how your decisions now will impact your long-term goals and successes. I’m suspicious of New Year’s Resolutions—the middle of winter is a dreadful time to launch significant life changes and a disruptive point in the calendar to make decisions, particularly when you’re living on the school calendar. However, the start of a new school year is a great time to make some decisions about this coming academic year… and about what comes next.

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A Campus Without Sexual Violence: Guest Post by Warren Light

A Campus Without Sexual Violence: Guest Post by Warren Light

The start of a school year is a critical time to discuss sexual violence prevention and appropriate response. The starting point is to remind ourselves that Sexual Violence can be prevented.  It is made possible by inequities and unhealthy power dynamics in our culture.  Those who perpetrate it are responsible for their actions, but we are all responsible to creating a world without sexual violence.

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Roommates: Early Conversations for a Better Freshman Year

Roommates: Early Conversations for a Better Freshman Year

One of the hardest things about living with someone new is realizing that everyone is truly different. It’s like going abroad in some ways—things you’ve always taken for granted about how “everyone is” turns out to not be as universal as you thought…and this can easily drive you absolutely crazy when confined to a tiny shared bedroom.

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Study Tips: Co-Writing An Essay

Study Tips: Co-Writing An Essay

Co-writing, if done right, means that both parties play to their strengths and ultimately do less work. It's also something that is a common exercise in the non-academic "real world." Most group projects in school do not resemble a work setting in the slightest—you will rarely be called upon to join a group of four colleagues in presenting on something you know very little about. However, you will often have to turn in a final product, written or otherwise, resulting from collaboration and compromise. In fact, many jobs rely almost completely on this model.

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Sunday Dinners: Spinach Salad with Fruit

Sunday Dinners: Spinach Salad with Fruit

Today's comfort food recipe is brought to you by my mom, who adapted this simple and delicious for a myriad of family meal occasions over the years. At its most basic it's a simple and fresh salad recipe, perfect for healthy side salads at home or as a contribution to a potluck or BBQ. The broad range of optional toppings makes it incredibly versatile.

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The Benefits of a Community College Education: Guest Post by Mark Rothenmeyer

The Benefits of a Community College Education: Guest Post by Mark Rothenmeyer

The low cost of tuition allows you, the student, to fulfill courses required for graduation while also taking classes to broaden your perspective, pursue your interests, and determine your future major. Many students arrive at expensive, four year institutions with the “undecided” block checked and spend a great deal of money trying to find their passion when they could have spent dramatically less had their search began at a community college.

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Cultural Preparation for Studying Abroad

Cultural Preparation for Studying Abroad

If at all possible, you should try to get a jumpstart on learning about the history and culture of the place you’re about to call your temporary home. Think about it as a kind of cultural acquaintance-making. You will by no means be able to learn everything about a country before you go. But some exploration ahead of time will mean you are better prepared and will have more context to understand the experiences in your new home.

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Education in the UK vs. the US: "What is Foucault?"

Education in the UK vs. the US: "What is Foucault?"

This is a blog post about liberal arts, the United States system of higher education, and my brief experience studying in Northern Ireland. Specifically, about the difference witnessed between my “breadth” of educational experience in liberal arts and the “depth” of background evidenced by my peers in the law program.

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Reverse Culture Shock and the Post-Abroad Slump

Reverse Culture Shock and the Post-Abroad Slump

Before you set off on a study abroad (or any prolonged travel), you will probably hear about culture shock time and time again. You’ll be warned that some aspects of culture or the mundane details of normal life will be different where you’re going, and that these differences will probably cause you to feel uncomfortable in ways you can’t anticipate before you go. When you travel, you encounter different expectations of “this is just how things are.” 

What isn’t discussed so often is the reverse shock of returning home.

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The Disconnected College Curriculum and "Spider Ed": Guest Post by "Professor X"

The Disconnected College Curriculum and "Spider Ed": Guest Post by "Professor X"

Colleges are no longer producing responsible citizens of the world.  This is a damning testament, since the world, or at least America, is clearly evolving toward entitled lifestyles where people are informed by their own filters and become disconnected from any real world.   Why is the college experience enabling students to remain on this path?

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Thesis Writing Basics: Choosing an Undergraduate Thesis Topic

Thesis Writing Basics: Choosing an Undergraduate Thesis Topic

An undergraduate thesis is the culmination of a college experience, and if you have the opportunity (or obligation) to write one, you will probably approach it with a mix of anxiety and anticipation. It is your chance to write something that is almost entirely self-directed: it will bring together the information and skills that you have learned thus far on your academic journey and set you free to pursue a specific research topic of your choice.

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Campus Involvement Leads to So Much More--Guest Post by Rebecca Rothkopf

Campus Involvement Leads to So Much More--Guest Post by Rebecca Rothkopf

College is all about figuring out who you are and what you want to do. That’s a big deal, and while classes are an important part of the college experience, I would argue that taking advantage of the opportunities to get involved on campus is equally important. To back up this argument, I’ve created a list to help back up why student activities and branching out of your comfort zone are both a valuable part of the college experience...

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Things I Had to Learn in College: Grocery Shopping

Things I Had to Learn in College: Grocery Shopping

One of the weird things about leaving home to go to college is that there’s an awful lot you have to learn and acclimatize to all at once. Not only do you have to adapt to a new style of teaching and learning, but you also are thrown into being in charge of maintaining your own life. I grew up doing chores, but my folks did a lot of looking after me. So I arrived at college knowing how to vacuum and wash dishes, but not how to do a myriad of other “grown up” things. I had to learn on the fly… and with varying degrees of success.

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